Was Your Doctor DEAD WRONG About This ONE Food?

This morning, I did what a lot of people may do: I cooked some eggs for breakfast.

eggs1But not all the eggs were whole!  In fact, I used only one whole egg and the rest egg whites in order to make my vegetable omelet.

Now, the reason for this is pretty simple: I LOVE eggs!

They are full of high-quality proteins that my body needs in order to repair and regenerate the many cells in my body.

But a lot of people – and there are more than you may think – avoid eggs due to the cholesterol found in the yolk.

They may be worried about heart disease…

Or altered cholesterol levels…

Maybe you’re even worried about high blood pressure.

Whatever the reason, you should know this: eggs should be an IMPORTANT nutrient to include in your daily or weekly menu plans for breakfast.

Why?

As previously mentioned, eggs have high-quality proteins that are important for many functions including repair and growth of lean muscle mass.

And, if you’re worried about the cholesterol found in eggs and it leading to higher cholesterol levels, don’t be!  A recent study showed that the cholesterol found in eggs did very little to raise your total or LDL cholesterol levels.

But if you truly are concerned, then including egg WHITES would provide you with high quality proteins WITHOUT adding any cholesterol to your day.

It may also provide something else…

And, if you have high blood pressure, you should pay very close attention to this…

Egg Whites and Blood Pressure

Egg whites contain a peptide – which is one of the building blocks of protein – called RVPSL.

And this peptide, when digested by your body, may lower your blood pressure – similar to a low-dose of some common ACE inhibiting medications.

ACE – which stands for angiotensin converting enzyme – has been shown to increase blood pressure by forcing your blood vessels to constrict – a process where angiotensin I is converted by this enzyme into angiotensin II.

This constriction leads to the blood moving at the same rate through the blood vessel, just with a narrower chamber.  And this is what creates that spike in pressure.

Now, drugs called ACE inhibitors prevent the activity of this enzyme, therefore preventing the conversion of angiotensin I, therefore lowering blood pressure.

And guess what?

A new study, presented at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, shows that the peptide found in egg whites – RVPSL – may lower blood pressure as effectively as a low-dose of the most popular ACE inhibiting medications.

Here’s what the study found:

First, they wanted to see if RVPSL was able to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

They tested the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the rats at 5, 10, 15, and 20 hours post-administration of RVPSL.

They found that 50 mg/kg of BW was comparable to a 10 mg/kg dose of Catopril (ACE inhibitor).

Meaning, a 50 mg dose was able to lower blood pressure similar to what would be seen in a low dose of the ACE inhibiting medication
Catopril.

Their conclusion:

“Therefore, egg white protein peptide may be useful to prevent or treat hypertension.”

More Eggs, Please!

Eggs, which provide high-quality proteins and good fats, should be part of a healthy breakfast.

Concerned about the yolk in eggs?  Don’t be!

The cholesterol found in yolk has been shown to NOT impact cholesterol levels like once thought.

And now, according to this study, egg whites may contain a peptide that is as effective at lowering blood pressure as some of the low-dose ACE inhibiting medications on the market today.

So you see, eggs are a potent source of nutrition that may not only improve your health, but may add positive benefits to your heart health.

All this in one incredible and very edible little egg!